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5 things that will make or break your business's Christmas

The countdown to Christmas is now on and we're in the midst of the headlong rush to get everything done and capitalise on any remaining opportunities before the Christmas lull. Busy period or not, Christmas causes a period of dislocation and volatility for most businesses. This dislocation and volatility mean that it is not 'business as usual' and for many businesses, it is the change that causes the problem.

Most business owners cope well with consistent trading conditions, where trading and business conditions are predictable as are the solutions to issues that arise, but it is a different story during periods of disruption. Here are some things to watch out for:

1. Ho, Ho, No. The trading stock headache. 

If business activity spikes over the Christmas period and you sell goods, then there is a temptation to increase stock levels. That makes sense as long as you don't go too far. Too much stock post the Christmas period and you will either be carrying product that is out of season or you will have too much cash tied up in trading stock. Try to work with suppliers who can supply on short notice. Better yet, see if some of your suppliers will supply you on consignment where you only pay them once the stock is sold. It might be better to miss a few sales than carry a trading stock headache into the New Year.

Managing your trading stock is not just about managing cost, consumers will go online if they cannot find what they need in store. Some savvy retailers are capitalising on this with opportunities to purchase online while instore if stock is not available or providing free shipping codes.

2. The discounting trend

Consumers now expect a bargain and can generally find one. The attraction of the Black Friday sales is that stock is generally available. Those waiting for bargains in the week immediately prior to Christmas, can only choose from what's left.

If you choose to discount stock (or the market forces you to), it's essential to know your profit margins to determine what you can afford to give away. A business with a 30% gross profit margin that offers a 25% discount (certainly nothing unusual about that in today's market) needs a 500% increase in sales volume simply to maintain the same position. The result generally is that often businesses trade below their breakeven point and generate losses. So, think carefully about your strategy and what you can sustain. 

3. The Christmas cost hangover

Costs tend to go up over Christmas. More staff, leave costs, downtime from non-trading days, as well as increased promotional costs all mean that the cost of doing business increases. Keep an eye on them. It's great to get into the Christmas spirit as long as you don't end up with a New Year hangover.

Many businesses also bring on casual staff. It's essential that you pay staff at the correct rates and meet your Superannuation Guarantee obligations.  Under the Retail Award, the rate for adult casuals (21 and over) start at $26.76. There is also a 3 hour shift minimum for all casuals regardless of whether you send them home early. Check the pay calculator to find the correct rates.

4. New Year cash flow crunch

The New Year often leads into a quieter trading and tighter cash flow period. The March quarter tends to be the toughest cash flow quarter of the year. You will need a cash buffer going into the New Year. Don't over commit yourself in the run up to year end and end up in trouble in the New Year.

5. Take a lesson from Scrooge

If you work with account customers, start your debtor follow up now. If your customers are under any cash flow pressures, the Christmas period will only increase that pressure. The creditors who chase hard and early will get paid first. Don't be the last supplier on the list; the bucket may be empty by then.

Christmas is a great time of year. Just don't get caught up in the rush and let things get out of control.



Super Guarantee: The new rules

From 1 July 2020, new rules will come into effect to ensure that an employee's salary sacrifice contributions cannot be used to reduce the amount of superannuation guarantee (SG) paid by the employer.

Under current rules, some employers are paying SG on the salary less any salary sacrificed contributions of the employee. Currently, employers must contribute 9.5% of an employee's Ordinary Time Earnings (OTE) and they choose whether or not to include the salary sacrificed amounts in OTE. 

Under the new rules, the SG contribution is 9.5% of the employee's 'ordinary time earnings (OTE) base'. The OTE base will be an employee's OTE and any amounts sacrificed into superannuation that would have been OTE, but for the salary sacrifice arrangement. Let's look at an example:

Pablo has quarterly Ordinary Time Earnings of $15,000 which would ordinarily generate an entitlement to $1,425 in SG contributions ($15,000 x 9.5%). He salary sacrifices $1,000 a quarter, expecting his superannuation contributions to rise to $2,425 for that quarter. 

However, his employer uses the sacrificed amount ($1,000) to satisfy part of the employer's mandated SG obligation, and only makes a total contribution of $1,425, mostly consisting of the employee's $1,000 salary sacrificed amount.

Under the new amendments, Pablo's $1000 sacrificed contribution will no longer reduce the charge. Therefore, the charge percentage would only be reduced by 2.83% ($425 / $15,000 x 100). As the employer is required to contribute 9.5% of the OTE base, they must contribute an additional 6.67% to meet their minimum SG obligations. The employer has a shortfall of approximately $1,000 (6.67% x $15,000).

As sacrificed contributions no longer reduce the charge Pablo's employer will need to contribute $1 425 (mandatory employer contributions) in addition to the $1,000 employee sacrificed amount, to avoid a shortfall and liability for the SG charge.

The amendments also ensure that where an employer has not fulfilled their SG obligations and the superannuation guarantee charge is imposed, the shortfall is calculated using the new OTE base.

The Super Guarantee timing trap for employers

How employers are being caught out by the timing of superannuation guarantee payments.

Employers can generally only claim a deduction for superannuation contributions in the income year in which the contribution is made. Super contributions are made when the payments are received by the trustee of a complying superannuation fund.

It's not uncommon for employers to be caught out by timing problems, many in the belief that the contribution has been made at the point the payment is made rather than when it is credited to the superannuation fund provider's account. Many forms of electronic transfer however are not guaranteed to be automatic or next day. BPay for example may take up to 2 days, a delay that is often not factored in.

A new practice statement from the ATO highlights the problem created by the use of clearing houses.

There is a specific element of the law that enables payments made to the Government's Small Business Superannuation Clearing House (SBSCH) to be accepted as contributions when the clearing house receives them, rather than when the trustee of the superannuation fund has received the contribution. The SBSCH is only available to small businesses with 19 or fewer employees, or with an annual aggregated turnover of less than $10 million. 

Private clearing houses are treated differently and as such, employers need to allow sufficient time for their superannuation contributions to be received, processed and paid by the clearing house to the superannuation fund, before their SG obligation is discharged.

Take the example of an employer who brings forward superannuation contributions before 30 June to be able to claim the tax deduction in that year.  If a private clearing house was used, and time was not allowed for the clearing house to process the payment, and as a result the payment was not received by the trustees before 30 June, then the deduction cannot be claimed until the next financial year



Can the tax office take money out of your account? Your right to know

You might have seen the recent spate of media freedom advertisements as part of the Your Right to Know campaign. The prime-time advertising states that the Australian Tax Office (ATO) can take money from your account without you knowing. The question is, do you really know what powers the ATO have?

The ATO is one of the most powerful institutions in Australia with very broad and encompassing powers. Over the last few years the approach has been to work with taxpayers to ensure that the tax they owe is paid. But this level of understanding only lasts so long and they will take action where taxpayers are unwilling to work with them, repeatedly default on an agreed payment plan, or don't take steps to resolve the situation (these steps include an expectation that you go into debt to clear your tax debt). And, there are also circumstances where the ATO can swoop in where they believe there is a need to secure assets such as bank accounts if there is a risk of disposal or flight risk.

The ATO's principal purpose is to collect the majority of the Federal Government's revenue. According to an Inspector-General of Taxation's report earlier this year, in 2016-17:

  • 88% of tax payments owing were made by the due date
  • 7% ($33.4bn) was paid within 90 days after the due date
  • 1.3% ($6.1bn) was paid within a year after the due date, and
  • $15 billion was left unpaid after a year.

At the end of the 2016-17 financial year, the total of undisputed collectable tax debt was $20.9 billion.

Here are just a few of the ATO's powers to ensure that tax owing is collected:

  • Issue a garnishee notice to someone holding money on your behalf – for example a bank. For salary and wage earners, the ATO can require your employer to take part of your salary and pay it to them until your tax debt is paid. This is generally limited to a maximum of 30% of your salary. If you are a business, the ATO can go as far as accessing your merchant facility if you have credit owing.
  • Director penalty notice – Directors can personally incur penalties equal to their company's unpaid PAYG withholding liabilities or superannuation guarantee charge. The Government wants to expand this to cover unpaid GST liabilities as well. If this debt is not paid, the ATO may issue a director penalty notice to start legal proceedings (and withhold any refunds due to the director).
  • Direction to pay super guarantee – if employers receive a direction to pay superannuation guarantee, any outstanding Superannuation Guarantee Charge must be paid within the period specified. It's a criminal offence not to comply with this notice and may result in enforced penalties and/or imprisonment. 
  • Impose a freezing order – for example, on your bank accounts. That is, without notice the ATO can freeze and then if required strip your accounts, particularly where they believe you have alternative sources of income. This freezing order cannot be initiated by the ATO but must be granted by a court.
  • Issue writs or warrants of execution, or warrants of seizure and sale. For example, they can force you to sell certain assets to pay your tax debts.
  • Winding up - liquidate your company or bankrupt you. Most taxpayers don't believe how strongly the ATO will act. The ATO can commence winding up procedures before any dispute is decided. In 2017-18 the ATO bankrupted 470 taxpayers and wound up 1,282 entities. The ATO would argue that in many cases the wind up forces the inevitable and prevents further debt being incurred either to the ATO or other parties.

The message is, make sure you are on top of your paperwork. If the ATO has queries or suspects something is not right, you need to be able to respond. The longer you take, or a lack of evidence, will only escalate the situation.

So, can the ATO take money out of your account without advising you first? With the support of the courts, absolutely and a whole lot more.

 

For further clarification on how these changes may affect you, please contact our team at Adams Triglone on 02 8848 3000 or enquiries@adamstriglone.com.au.



The material and contents provided in this publication are informative in nature only. It is not intended to be advice and you should not act specifically on the basis of this information alone.  If expert assistance is required, professional advice should be obtained. 

 

 

 

 

 

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